(Part 2) March 22, 2020 Sunday Sermon:

What It Means To Trust God

By Pastor Robbie Casas

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2. To be able to trust God is to establish clearly to ourselves again who He is.

            “14… I say, ‘You are my God.’”

            David here is actually doing 3 things:

            First, he is once more reminding himself of whom he is placing his trust in: God! Not anything or anybody else but God who is above all things and sovereign ruler over all things.

            We must remember God as the Sovereign Lord who is:

~ All-powerful (Ps 62:11, “Once God has spoken; twice I have heard this: that power belongs to God.”; Ex 15:6, “Your right hand, O LORD, is majestic in power, Your right hand, O LORD, shatters the enemy.”; Isa 26:4, “Trust in the Lord forever, for in Yah, the Lord, is everlasting strength” NKJV.)

~ All-wise (1Sam 2:3b, “For the LORD is a God of knowledge….”; Ps 147:5, “Great is our Lord and abundant in strength; His understanding is infinite.”; Rom 11:33, “Oh, the depth of the riches both of the wisdom and knowledge of God! How unsearchable are His judgments and unfathomable His ways!”)

~ Perfectly loving (Ex 34:6, “Then the LORD passed by in front of him and proclaimed, ‘The LORD, the LORD God, compassionate and gracious, slow to anger, and abounding in lovingkindness and truth.’”; Jn 3:16, “For God so loved the world, that He gave His only begotten Son, that whoever believes in Him shall not perish, but have eternal life.”)

~ Absolutely holy (Ex 15:11, “Who is like You among the gods, O LORD? Who is like You, majestic in holiness….”; 1Sam 2:2, “There is no one holy like the LORD, indeed, there is no one besides You….”; 1Pet 1:16, “because it is written, ‘YOU SHALL BE HOLY, FOR I AM HOLY.’”).

         This is why the Lord in Ps 46:10 reminds us of this when He commands us, “Be still, and know that I am God.” It’s like He’s saying, “The circumstance is not God. I am. The calamity is not God. I am, The problem or need is not God. I am. That troublesome person is not God. I am. This virus is not God. I am. You are not God. I am! So shush!”

         Secondly, David was not just claiming God as God, but God as my God”! In other words, David was trusting not in some distant, far away, detached God (like the God of Open Theism) with whom he had no relationship except for the fact that he was a creation of this God.

         There was a sense of possession, of belonging when he says “my God”. This was a very personal God!

         This is a God who knows us (Jn 10:3, “… he calls his own sheep by name….”; Isa 49:15-16“Can a woman forget her nursing child, that she should have no compassion on the son of her womb? Even these may forget, yet I will not forget you. 16 Behold, I have engraved you on the palms of my hands…”; Psalm 139). Our God knows us perfectly and intimately.

         This God is our Father (Jn 1:12, “But to all who did receive him, who believed in his name, he gave the right to become children of God.”; Matt 6:9, “Pray then like this: ‘Our Father in heaven…’”; Rom 8:15, “For you did not receive the spirit of slavery to fall back into fear, but you have received the Spirit of adoption as sons, by whom we cry, ‘Abba! Father!’”).

         This God is ever present (Heb 13:5c, “… he has said, ‘I will never leave you nor forsake you.’”; Matt 1:23, “… they shall call his name Immanuel’ (which means, God with us).”; Ps 46:1b, “… a very present help in trouble.”).

         Moreover, thirdly, “14… I say, ‘You are my God’” is not only a reminder to David of who his God is but also a declaration of loyalty to this God in the midst of his dire circumstances. C.H. Spurgeon said of this passage: “He proclaimed aloud his determined allegiance to Jehovah. He was no fair-weather believer, he could hold to his faith in a sharp frost, and wrap it about him as a garment fitted to keep out all the ills of time.”

         These first two things have clear implications for us with regard to the next several things we will look at if we are to understand what it is to trust in God.

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